VUE Software to Provide Compensation Management System With Revenue Reconciliation for Insurance Technology and Distribution Organization

COCONUT CREEK, Fla., July 8, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — VUE Software® today announced that a rapidly growing health insurance technology and distribution partner recently selected the VUE Compensation Management™ solution for its compensation management infrastructure. A subsidiary of one of the top ten health insurance companies in the United States the organization is hiring and training thousands of agents and service workers. The firm plans to leverage the system’s comprehensive commission management capabilities, which include automated revenue reconciliation, to confirm commission accuracy across multiple carriers, maintain smooth operations and ensure correct, timely agent compensation.

Because of its highly specialized business model, rapid growth and ongoing interactions with carriers, exchanges, agents and consumers, the insurance service partner required a robust, configurable system able to scale to high business volumes. Revenue reconciliation was a deciding factor due to the need to verify payment accuracy across a multi-carrier, multi-hierarchy environment and incorporate pay structures such as flat fees, percentages and multiple commission tiers. In addition, higher transaction volumes were anticipated to accommodate the effects of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and increases in Medicare use with a shifting retiree population.

The service partner chose VUE Compensation Management following a referral from an existing VUE Software client on the basis of revenue reconciliation. The solution is being integrated into the service partner’s technology and will provide comprehensive revenue reconciliation capabilities as partnerships are established in the organization’s aggressive growth phase.

“With our dedicated insurance focus and successful track record with reputable clients, VUE Software is an excellent choice for companies that need to rise above industry complexities and healthcare reform challenges,” said Abhinav Dave, executive vice president of VUE Software. “Unlike many solutions, automated reconciliation is built into VUE Compensation Management so our customers can keep pace with complex commission environments. Reconciling variations between expected revenue and payments received is just good business, but doing it manually can be extremely time-consuming. Higher transaction volumes increase the potential for error, particularly in multi-carrier situations. Only a sophisticated system like ours can make accuracy easy.”

VUE Compensation Management’s revenue reconciliation module enables service providers, managing general agents (MGAs), Health Insurance Exchanges (HIXs), carriers and other key partners to forecast, track, measure, compare and recognize earned revenue and avoid agent overpayments. Automation streamlines payment and reconciliation processes, saves time and money, helps eliminate errors and increases overall efficiencies. The system helps strengthen partner relationships by providing factual evidence for any payment errors, since all calculations are documented according to the contracted commission structure.

About VUE Software®

VUE Software is a leading provider of distribution, incentive compensation and sales performance management suites. Backed by over 20 years of insurance experience, VUE Software solutions are built to meet the unique needs of the life, health, property and casualty, and distribution verticals. VUE Software is a doing-business-as (DBA) name of Computer Solutions and Software International, LLC (CSSI).

Review: Seagate Wireless Plus

The storage capacity is relatively limited tablet often makes us have to be smart to choose which content you want to keep in it. Not realizing it, remove and insert the digital content such as music video and it turns out that quite a lot of time consuming.
Well, one of the more clever solution is to use an external hard disk as Wi-Fi. Seagate Wireless Plus (SWP) is the replacement for the Seagate GoFlex Wireless (SGW) which appeared in 2011. There are some improvements that are owned SWP as larger capacity, longer battery life, as well as support for streaming 8 connections at once. The size is also smaller than SGW, and attractive, the price is not much different from SGW.
To fill the data into SWP, you just connect it to a PC via a fast USB 3.0 connection. If desired, you can replace with Thunderbolt or Firewire connector (sold separately). SWP is very easy to operate. You simply press the on / off button is there, then set your device to connect via Wi-Fi access point to the SWP. While connected to the SWP, you can still connect to the Internet by connecting the device to a Wi-Fi hotspot through SeagateMedia application available free on Play Store and AppStore.
Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories
Wireless Plus has been arranged with several standard folders such as Videos, Music, Photos, and Documents. But you can create your own folders if desired. SeagateMedia application quite well, but does not support all video formats. To music, more fully supported formats. As for the documents, Seagate will ask what application you want to use to open the document. I tried it on the Galaxy Note 10.1 and the Apple iPad 3. The results are quite varied and SWP proved more smoothly used in the Android platform, especially for video playback.
seagate wireless plus 1 Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories
Review: Seagate Wireless Plus
Full HD video in a streaming format. MP4 can be done smoothly, while for the format. Above 1GB MKV, a little choked up. This is not a problem in the SWP, but more to the software problem. Fortunately
You can use other applications to play the video. SWP battery is claimed to last up to 10 hours. But if you continue to take streaming video, then the battery will be filled after 6-7 hours. If it varies, then the battery will be able to last up to 9-10 hours.
Seagate Wireless Plus is an easy to use, very handy, and will remain relevant for longer than a new gadget you bought. The price is quite high, but the ability is quite worth it.

Logitech headsets and webcams for the business professional

As many of you know, I’m a full-time telecommuter. Although a portion of my work involves some travel, most days I am working from home, and a lot of that involves sitting on conference calls with colleagues and customers/partners.

Until recently, much of that required that I be desk-bound.

Anyone who has to work with VOIP and IP-based conferencing systems such as Skype, Microsoft Lync, Cisco WebEx and Citrix GoToMeeting knows that voice quality is everything if you’re going to have an effective business conversation.

And that means using devices that typically tie you to your desk, such as a wired headset or an Bluetooth/USB speakerphone, such as the Plantronics Callisto, which I have and think is an excellent product.

While there are many Bluetooth headsets and earpieces on the market which are perfectly suitable for mobile phone conversations, few are specifically optimized for use with PCs that have VOIP “Soft Phone” software, and do not deliver what I would regard as business critical voice quality.

They are perfectly fine for short calls, but not ideal when you are on a VOIP conference for as much as an hour at a time, or even longer, particularly when you need to be an active participant and when paying close attention to who is speaking and the clarity of what you are saying is essential.

As we all know about Bluetooth when it comes to audio streams, the farther you get away from the transceiver, the worse the audio gets. So it’s not practical to stray too far away from your PC.

Logitech’s latest wireless headsets have been a total game changer for my personal work situation since I’ve been using them the last few months. I’ve been using the H820e stereo version which retails for $199 but can be found for considerably less.

Installation and use of the headset is pretty straightforward — you plug the DECT 6.0 transmitter and charging base into a free USB port on your PC or Mac, and the AC power cord to power the base. The headset charges on the base when not in use, and has a built-in rechargeable battery.

The operating system recognizes it automatically, and depending on the VOIP program you are using, you may need to alter the settings to use the headset as your primary audio device.

If you’re familiar with the DECT 6.0 1.9Ghz wireless transmission standard, particularly if you have cordless phones in your house that use the technology, you know that you can get some pretty impressive range and not lose any voice quality. That’s exactly what the H820e headset gives you for VOIP calls.

My home office is a good 60 feet away from my living room and around 75 feet from my “breakfast area” which has my espresso machine and a table which faces my outdoor patio and pool area with outdoor furniture which is about 100 feet or so away from the base transmitter.

So regardless of what VOIP software I am using, and where I am in my house, I get the same crystal-clear voice quality as if I am sitting right in front of my PC. For example, this wearable computing podcast that I recorded with Rick Vanover of Veeam was actually done in my living room, while wearing the H820e using Skype.

So the quality of the audio is without dispute. What about the overall design and using it?

The H820e was designed for use for hours at a time. The stereo version is comfortable and after a while you forget you even have it on your head. While I am extremely pleased with the device, I have only a few nitpicks:

First, the “Mute” button is attached to the microphone boom and is recessed back towards where the headphone is. It doesn’t stick prominently out, so you have to sort of feel your way up the boom to finding it.

If you’re away from your PC and are not near the software controls of your VOIP client, and some sort of unplanned audio distraction occurs that you don’t want to be heard by everyone else, then it could take a few seconds to mute the audio while you fumble around with the boom. It would be better if in the next version of this product that they put it on the exterior side of the headphone holding the boom.

It’s a minor annoyance but it’s still an annoyance nonetheless.

The second is the boom mic’s sensitivity to airflow. Now, normally you don’t have a lot of “wind” in an indoor or office setting but in the summertime in Florida, I like to have a fan going in my office for better air circulation.

If that fan is pointed directly at me, it sounds like I am in an outdoor breeze. And if you are actually outdoors (like sitting on my patio and having a cup of coffee) and a little bit of wind picks up, you’re going to hear it if the mic isn’t muted, no question.

Also, if you are a heavy breather, you’ll probably want to have the boom twisted a lot farther away from your mouth than you think you need it.

Despite what I would call these two minor nitpicks I think the H820e is an excellent product and I heartily reccomend it. I’ve also spent some time with their wired headset, the H650e on business trips with my laptop and also on my Surface RT using Skype and Lync, and the audio is just as high quality as the H820e, provided your bandwidth supports the fidelity of the connection.

Not all telecommuting and conferencing is about audio, however. From time to time I do need to do video as well.

My corporate laptop, my Lenovo X1 Carbon is a great little machine but its webcam isn’t its strong suit. When it’s docked to my monitor on my desk at home, I need something that delivers much more robust and HD-quality video.

I’ve written about small busines and SOHO/workgroup video conferencing products before, like Logitech’s BCC950. While the BCC950 is an excellent product for small meeting rooms and for having three to five people on camera at once, it’s overkill for a telecommuter or just someone in a single office.

Enter the Logitech C930e, a “Business” webcam. Like any other webcam it clips to the top of your monitor and plugs into your USB 2.0 or 3.0 port. But this is no ordinary webcam.

At a street price of $129.00 it’s more expensive than Logitech’s consumer/prosumer webcam offerings, but there’s considerable enterprise-class video conferencing technology built-into this little device.

First, provided your bandwidth supports it, the C930e can capture 1080p video (or 15MP stills) at 30 frames a second because it includes Scalable Video Coding using H.264 and UVC 1.5, the second of which is needed to be certified for use with corporate-grade video conferencing tools.

Second, the camera has a 90-degree diagonal field of view so you get a widescreen capture of the subject without any “fish eye” distortion. You also get a Carl Zeiss lens and 4X digital zoom with software pan and tilt control, as well as built-in stereo microphones

Logitech also offers the consumer-oriented C920 which is about $30 cheaper than the C930e, but it lacks the the Scalable Video Coding and UVC 1.5 capabilities used with corporate applications like Lync and Cisco UC and is more suited towards Skype and other consumer video applications like Google Hangouts. It also lacks the 90-degree FOV of its more expensive sibling.

While the two cameras look very similar, they shouldn’t be confused with each other. If corporate video conferencing capability and quality is definitely what you need, you want the C930e.

Crank Software Selects GrammaTech to Turn Up Software Quality and Security

GrammaTech, Inc., a leading software developer specializing in software assurance tools, today announced that Crank Software, Inc., an innovator of embedded graphical user interface (GUI) solutions, is using GrammaTech’s CodeSonar to advance the integrity of their code.

Crank Software’s products and services enable R&D teams and user interface (UI) designers to quickly and collaboratively develop rich, animated UIs for resource-constrained embedded devices. These embedded software solutions are used in safety-critical applications, such as animated global positioning systems, in-car graphical displays and user interfaces on factory floors, so software quality and security are paramount. To enhance these areas, the team at Crank is now using CodeSonar’s advanced static analysis capability to more efficiently find and fix quality and security issues within their code.

“We wanted an innovative, high-performance static analysis tool we could drop into our process and quickly see improvements,” explained Thomas Fletcher, VP of Research and Development at Crank Software. Now that Crank’s development teams have integrated CodeSonar into their production process, quantifiable results have reinforced their choice to adopt the powerful tool. “Issues are being caught and fixed very early in the coding process. I look at these as problems I won’t have to hassle with in QA, and most critically, calls to customers I will never have to make,” he said.

CodeSonar provides Crank’s team with a high quality solution that integrates well and allows Crank’s engineers to fix problems early in development, saving time. As a result, they’ve also improved their end product and Crank Software is now feeling better-positioned for the certifications it wants to achieve to drive greater adoption. As Fletcher explained, “We wanted a comprehensive tool to push the quality and security of our software forward. And we got exactly what we aimed for.”

For a more detailed look into Crank Software’s adoption of CodeSonar, view the case study.

About GrammaTech and CodeSonar:
GrammaTech’s static analysis tools are used worldwide by Fortune 500 companies, educational institutions, startups and government agencies. The staff includes 15 PhD experts in static analysis and a superb engineering team, all focused on creating the most innovative and in-depth analysis algorithms. The company’s flagship product, CodeSonar, is a sophisticated static analysis tool that performs a whole-program, interprocedural analysis on C/C++, Java and binary code, identifying complex programming bugs that can result in serious reliability or security problems. More information about CodeSonar can be found on our website at

Easy Solutions Helps Fight Mobile Banking Fraud with Detect Safe Browsing (DSB) 4.0, Now Available for iPhone and Android

Easy Solutions, the Total Fraud Protection® company, today released Detect Safe Browsing (DSB) version 4.0. With DSB 4.0, financial institution can provide an important additional layer of fraud prevention to the end-user, to better protect against malware and other sophisticated threats such as, pharming, man-in-the-middle (MITM) and man-in-the browser (MITB) attacks. With DSB 4.0, Easy Solutions now extends this support to the two most popular mobile platforms: Android and iOS, ensuring that over 90%1 of mobile users can securely access their mobile banking accounts.

The APWG recently reported over 1.3 million confirmed-malicious files for Android alone2, making mobile malware one of the fastest growing classes of threats.

“Mobile banking has become the preferred method for many consumers to conduct their online banking. Unfortunately for financial institutions, some of the most insidious and difficult-to-detect malware is now being targeted at the mobile end-point,” said Daniel Ingevaldson, CTO of Easy Solutions. “With Detect Safe Browsing now available for iPhone and Android devices, financial institutions will be able to provide their customers with a simple and unobtrusive way to secure their mobile banking experience.”

DSB is a critical component of Easy Solutions’ Total Fraud Protection platform, which provides comprehensive fraud protection across all channels, and extended to the end-user. By combining cross-channel risk-scoring, transaction anomaly detection, multi-factor authentication, secure browsing, and detection and take-down services, Easy Solutions blocks criminals at all three phases of the fraud lifecycle – planning, launching, and cashing – while ensuring that authorized users can conduct business.

DSB 4.0 from Easy Solutions provides visibility and real-time intelligence of the threats impacting consumers. Based on a proprietary cross validation technology that prevents re-direction to fraudulent websites, DSB 4.0 includes some of the following capabilities:

  • Secure Mobile Browsing with the DSB App: The free DSB app, now available for both iOS and Android devices, gives customers a simple way to protect bank transactions performed on their mobile device or tablet
  • Accelerated Disinfection: DSB enables customers to quickly deploy on-demand cleanup procedures for malware related advanced persistent threats (APTs), enabling financial institutions to mitigate zero-day and targeted attacks.
  • Active Phishing Protection: DSB provides enhanced phishing protection based on Detect Monitoring Services’ (DMS) black list. Since DMS detects phishing attacks in early stages, DSB users are protected from the very latest phishing scams, minimizing their exposure to fraud.
  • Proactive, Real-time Malware Protection: DSB employs proprietary cross-validation technology that detects DNS poisoning and ensures that the end user can connect to the protected site. When an active redirection is detected, DSB stops the fraudulent connection.

ABOUT EASY SOLUTIONS

Easy Solutions delivers Total Fraud Protection® to over 100 clients, with over 32 million end users. The company’s products protect against phishing, pharming, malware, Man-in-the-Middle and Man-in-the-Browser attacks, and deliver multifactor authentication and transaction anomaly detection. For more information, visit http://www.easysol.net, or follow us on Twitter @goeasysol.

Asus Launches Multi-Series External Hard Disk is Not Boring

PONTIANAK – Asus, the main leader in the digital era has once again expanded its product line in Indonesia. Asus after winning a strong position in the notebook industry and penetrated the tablet and smartphone segment with innovative products such as Pad MeMO, Fonepad, and PadFone, ASUS is now presenting the ranks of the external hard disk.
In the early stages, there are four models of 2.5-inch external hard disk Asus marketed in Indonesia. The four models are series DL, KR, Leather II, and AN300 series.
Manager of Product Management and Marketing, Asus Indonesia, Juliana Cen, said user request on storage devices continues to increase along with the increasing use of the computing device itself.
“In order to meet the needs of these users, we present an external storage media products are not simply a storage medium, but also a product with aesthetic and beauty,” he told the Tribune, Sunday (28/07/2013).
Juliana states, external hard disk does not have to be boring. With the design of David Lewis, DL Asus HD Ext 2.5 “- 1TB, turn the computing experience with thinness. Moreover, Asus DL 2.5” can work without the need for instant installation and driver.
“Hard disk is fitted with antishock features for data protection. Use elegant design makes a stylish special cable can be stored so that the disk is still looks neat when not in use,” he explained.
While other models, Asus KR 2.5 “Ext HDD 1TB presents unique colors, namely brown terran. External hard disk that comes with the glossy texture and charming appearance. With a capacity of 1TB, KR 2.5” supports a hectic lifestyle with spectacular durability and features easier is used.
While Asus Leather II 2.5 “500GB Ext HDD, not just accessories, but a lifestyle statement. For users who value their data, the hard disk is a charming leather-clad luxury solutions.
“Hard disk is equipped with a super-speed USB 3.0 for the fastest transfer process at this time, and can work with all file formats, without requiring installation or drivers,” said Juliana.
In addition, there is still one more model that Asus AN300 2.5 “500GB Ext HDD has a charming color and made of aluminum. Asus AN300 change the perception of external hard disk with the old-fashioned charming style. Asus AN300 stylish, ultra lightweight, ultra thin, and can work at any time with immediate access through USB 3.0 is ready to bring the data owner anywhere without a problem but still stylish.
Asus AN300 also works well with laptops, desktops, and other media players, thus helping the owner move data quickly, safely, and easily.

Surge Software Announces General Availability of SurgeHub – Full Suite of Mobile Tools for the Entire Sales Lifecycle

Surge Software, Inc. announced today the general availability of their new mobile sales enablement platform, SurgeHub. SurgeHub is a mobile content management (CMS), customer relationship management (CRM), and order entry application that provides a true mobile sales enablement solution to sales teams large and small.

The tablet, mobile, and web-based application allows sales teams to upload, organize, and share sales material, queue up content for upcoming presentations, show PowerPoint presentations in slideshow mode, fill out and digitally sign forms, and track and monitor content usage and sessions with clients. SurgeHub also allows sales teams to easily manage their accounts and contacts, setup customized deal flows, collaborate with other team members, and manage tasks across the organization. In addition, SurgeHub includes a mobile order entry tool, is branded and customized to fit the needs of each unique business, and works both online and offline.

SurgeHub is the first product of its kind to support the entire sales cycle on a mobile device, from giving the initial presentation, to managing content and customers, to taking and tracking orders. SurgeHub is unique in the sense that it allows companies choose to use the full suite of sales enablement features or a subset of features depending on their company needs, giving businesses both large and small the option of tailoring the application to their specific needs.

“There are a number of products in the market that support part of the sales process, such as giving presentations or managing contacts. SurgeHub is the first application to support the entire sales process from giving an initial presentation to taking an order, and everything in-between,” said Matt MacKay, CEO of Surge Software, Inc. “Sales people don’t want to deal with multiple tools from multiple vendors, and the proliferation of mobile apps is just making things worse. We bring sanity to the market for sales teams by giving them an intuitive, easy-to-use sales enablement tool that works the same on any device, including desktops, laptops, tablets, and cell phones.”

“We chose SurgeHub as our mobile sales enablement tool because of the comprehensive feature set and the ease of use,” said Jason Abromaitis, CEO of Simple Serve.” The usage tracking features help us to understand what is going on in the field. SurgeHub is an essential tool for any mobile sales team.”

SurgeHub can be used stand-alone or it can be connected to 3rd party systems. A web version is included for desktop/browser-based access. SurgeHub can be used in a hosted “SaaS / Cloud” model or it can be installed on premise.

Sprint’s HTC 8XT brings BoomSound and HTC camera to Windows Phone 8

Sprint HTC 8XT retail package

I was given an HTC 8X at the Windows Phone 8 launch event and loved the design that seemed to disappear in your hand. Sprint hasn’t seen much Windows Phone love, but has two decent options for customers. I’ve been using the HTC 8XT for a couple days and wanted to share some first impressions.

The HTC 8XT from Sprint brings a mixture of HTC’s best with design aspects of the HTC 8X and 8S, along with features from the excellent HTC One. It is available now from Sprint for $99.99 with a 2-year contract.

Hardware

It comes in California Blue and at first glance looks like a slightly larger 8S with a different shade of color on the bottom button area. Specifications include:

  • 4.3 inch 800×480 pixels resolution Gorilla Glass display
  • 1.4 GHz dual-core processor
  • 1GB RAM
  • 8GB integrated storage with microSD card (up to 64GB supported)
  • 8 megapixel rear camera and 1.6 megapixel front camera
  • HTC BoomSound front facing stereo speakers
  • Bluetooth 3.0, 802.11 a/b/g/n WiFi, and NFC
  • 1,800 mAh battery
  • Dimensions of 5.2 x 2.6 x 0.39 inches and 4.9 ounces

As you can see this is more of a mid-range device with the lower resolution display, 8GB of internal storage, and processor. Then you see high end aspects with the HTC BoomSound speakers, Beats Audio, NFC, and 1GB of RAM.

Like the HTC 8X, the 8XT feels great in your hand and if I was a Sprint customer looking for a Windows Phone then this would probably be the one. The camera has been improved over the 8X with a more attractive design around the lens and new HTC Camera utility. The HTC Camera utility gives you some different effects to use when you capture your photo, just like the HTC One camera utility. You also get the ability to capture photos in burst mode with the software then selecting the best shot so you can make sure to capture the best photo. You can also capture still images while recording video, something again seen on HTC Android devices.

Software

The HTC 8XT launches with Windows Phone 8, which is a very functional OS that has enough apps to compete with iOS and Android. You will find all the typical Windows Phone 8 functionality in the 8XT with some HTC-specific experiences included. Windows Phone 8’s latest Data Sense utility is included with Office, OneNote, Wallet, and more. Don’t forget you can also download and install HERE Maps from Nokia on the 8XT.

HTC includes their weather/news/stocks utility, handy flashlight app, photo enhancer, unit converter, and utility to manage space on your device. As I mentioned earlier, they also provide an HTC Camera app similar to what Nokia does with their special apps. I haven’t taken a ton of photos yet, but so far I am pleased with the camera performance and functionality of the HTC Camera application.

Sprint also includes apps and services, but like all Windows Phone devices you can easily remove anything you want, unlike on Android devices. Sprint apps and services include Sprint Music Plus, Sprint TV and Movies, Visual Voicemail, and Slacker Radio.

I was pleasantly surprised to find Telenav Scout on the HTC 8XT since I find this application to be quite useful on my iPhone 5. I did not know they had a Windows Phone 8 client and after trying it on the HTC 8XT I saw it is also available on T-Mobile Windows Phone devices so I installed it on my new Nokia Lumia 925.

First experiences

The HTC 8XT is a solid Windows Phone device for Sprint customers. The device feels excellent in your hand and the resolution looks good on a 4.3 inch display. All the user reviews on the Sprint site show nearly all five star ratings so it seems Sprint customers like the device so far.

The light weight and curved design of the 8X always appealed to me and the 8XT continues that look and feel. With the soft touch material all around, the 8XT doesn’t slide around and the California Blue looks great.

I understand that there is still no LTE coverage in the Puget Sound area so I won’t be able to test out those speeds unless I travel in the next couple of weeks. With Seattle being the home of Microsoft and Windows Phone, I find this lack of LTE to be rather disappointing.

Pre-Order Asus 31.5″ 4K IGZO Monitor for $3500

Asus is reportedly now taking pre-orders for its 31.5 inch monitor (PQ321Q) featuring Sharp’s anti-glare LED-backlit IGZO technology. It sports a screen resolution of 3840 x 2160, 140 pixels per inch, and not only cuts down on energy consumption but features an extremely long durability given that Sharp’s tech doesn’t constantly refresh the images. It’s all static until something moves on-screen.

The company introduced the new monitor last month, reporting that Sharp’s IGZO tech supports smaller transistors than amorphous silicon thanks to significantly higher electron mobility. It also not only reduces energy consumption, but reduces the monitor’s overall bulk as well: at 35 mm at its thickest point, the PQ321 is the thinnest 4K UHD monitor available today, the company said.

A Sharp rep said during CES 2013 in January that the 31.5 inch panel will be marketed to professionals first given the end-price. The prototype also had ten-point touch input which apparently didn’t make it into the company’s own PN-K321 31.5 inch IGZO monitor selling for $5,000 USD. The Asus model also doesn’t support touch.

The upcoming PQ321Q supports wide 176° horizontal and vertical viewing angles, 10 bit RGB “deep” color, and an 8 millisecond gray-to-gray response time. Other features include a 0.182 mm pixel pitch, a max brightness of 350 cd/m2, a max contrast ratio of 800:1, picture-by-picture support and HDCP support. The monitor’s typical power consumption is 93 watts.

On the connectivity front, the I/O panel has two HDMI ports, a DisplayPort, and an RS-232C port for old-school VGA connections. There’s also a 3.5 mm mini-jack for PC audio input, a 3.5 mm mini-jack for AV audio input, and a 3.5 mm mini-jack for earphones (for HDMI and DisplayPort).

Last month the company said that the new display is the “equivalent to four Full HD displays stacked side-by-side.” It can now be pre-ordered on Amazon here, and on Newegg here, both requesting $3,499.99 USD. The monitor is slated to arrive on July 16, 2013.

Microsoft still has ‘a way to go’ in determining its market for Windows 8, says Network Rail

Microsoft has “a bit of a way to go” in determining which market it is targeting for Windows 8, even though the operating system has now been on the market for over a year, Network Rail’s head of information systems strategy Simon Goodman has told Computing.

Goodman praised Microsoft’s early entries into hybrid-led technology via Windows 8, saying there was definitely “a need” for hybrid notebook-tablets, and that this was something Network Rail had “explored internally”.

“We’ve already looked at Surface-based devices,” confirmed Goodman.

“It gives you a combination of nice tablet looks and feel, a lightweight device, but it’s got a bit of grunt behind it, so if you need to do something a little bit more hefty from an applications perspective, you’ve got the tools and capabilities to do that,” he said.

But Goodman described the move from Windows 7 to 8, with its added Modern apps interface, as “a huge jump” for Microsoft, which could affect ease of adoption for some of Network Rail’s workers.

“If you’re a traditional desktop user, it’s quite difficult to get to the look and feel of how that works, and how to navigate around it,” said Goodman.

But Goodman maintained that, from a tablet perspective, “it’s not that hard to work out where you go, and everything else”.

However, Goodman is going to hold fire before rolling out any Windows 8 systems en masse at Network Rail.

“For me, it’s something we will look to embrace where it makes sense to do so, but I still think Microsoft has got a bit of a way to go yet to determine exactly what market it wants to play into,” said Goodman.

Look out for the full-length video interview with Network Rail’s Simon Goodman on Computing very soon.